Caulking Your Foundation

Caulking Your Foundation

If you have a home in New England, there is a good chance that you have some type of “foundation” associated with your home.

Foundations are found at the base of your home and serve as a solid structure for your home to be built on top of.

There are many analogies across life that reference the importance of building a strong foundation, what we are discussing here is the actual, real-life application of these popular metaphors.

Foundations can be built out of brick, cinderblock, stone, or any other of a number of masonry materials.

As important as properly constructing a foundation is when it is originally built, equally as important is making sure that it is well maintained as it ages over time.


Some folks like to paint their foundation, other do not and instead may elect to apply some type of a clear water proofer to it or elect to leave it “natural”.

Some folks like to paint their foundation, other do not and instead may elect to apply some type of a clear water proofer to it or elect to leave it “natural”.

Although I am not the biggest fan of painting a foundation, I do realize that many people LOVE painted foundations (or even if they are ambivalent to their foundations being painted, they may inherit them when they purchase a home having one).

As long as the paint is well-maintained and exterior and interior moisture is regulated appropriately, there is nothing technically “wrong” about having a painted foundation.

Whether painted or not, one item that is imperative to stay on top of is making sure that exterior moisture is not allowed entry into the home from cracks forming in the foundation itself or at the point where the foundation meets the ground.


If a crack forms in the foundation itself and it is not painted, having the mortar appropriately corrected is necessary (sometimes with the help of an experienced mason) through means of properly re-pointing it.

If a crack forms in the foundation itself and it is not painted, having the mortar appropriately corrected is necessary (sometimes with the help of an experienced mason) through means of properly re-pointing it.

If the foundation is painted and cracks in the foundation form, utilizing some type of caulk meant for caulking the joints in your foundation would absolutely be fine.

In this scenario, it is important to determine whether or not the caulk is able to be painted prior to its application.

Another area of the foundation that is super critical to avoid cracking from existing much longer than after the point in time it is discovered, is the point where the foundation itself meets solid ground that is built upon with asphalt, concrete, cement, or a similar material.

If cracks are found in these areas, there are specialty caulks that should be used to correct these nuisance gaps.

“Regular” caulk should never be used.

My “go-to” product in these situations is a product called ‘Dymonic’.

Dymonic is solvent-based, which essentially means that you should have paint thinner on hand (vs. water) for help in cleaning any excess Dymonic if need be.

Dymonic comes in tubes as traditional caulk does, but the way it is formulated makes it the perfect caulk to be used in these situations.

A Dymonic dealer can be found with the help of a simple online search or inquiring about it at your local lumberyard.

Exterior moisture penetration is something that can lead to very expensive foundation repairs down the line.

Carefully inspecting your foundation every once in a while, (at least once per year) can be extraordinarily helpful in staying ahead of things and helping to ensure that your foundation remains solidly intact for years to come.

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